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Morels: Portrait of a fungus

Described as smoky and mouth-watering, complex, smelling of fresh soil and raw milk, earthy, nutty, meaty, buttery, and decadent, the morel has been used in cooking since time immemorial. This mushroom is as much a sign of spring as robins, flowers, and young lovers. The ancients related morels to the cycles of the moon, using them to predict flushes of the mushroom, when wild bumper crops seemed to spring up from nothing overnight. Read more

Magic mushrooms: A look at the allure of truffles

In the preface to his La Physiologie du Goût (The Physiology of Taste), published in 1825, Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin said that “whosoever says truffle, utters a grand word, which awakens erotic and gastronomic ideas.” Alexandre Dumas, writer of the iconic The Three Musketeers, once said of these mycological darlings, “They can, on certain occasions, make women more tender and men more lovable.” Read more